Women's Studies

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Scope note(s)

  • Special Collections & Archives preserves archival collections, books, and periodicals that support research in women’s, gender, and family studies. Archival collections include papers of individual women and women’s organizations that support the study of women’s history in Canada from the mid-nineteenth century to the late twentieth century. The book and periodical collections have a wide historical and geographical focus, including works on the role and place of women in society from the sixteenth to the twentieth century. In general, the collections fall into the following broad categories: birth control and eugenics, broadcasting and journalism, domestic arts, education, medicine and science, organizations, politics, women’s rights and suffrage, and writers.
  • The first of the women’s studies collections were acquired in the mid-1960s due to the combined interests of Doris Lewis, then university librarian, and the National Council of Women of Canada. The National Council had assembled a library on the history of women and donated it to the fledgling University of Waterloo Library as a centennial project in 1967. Council members were, in turn, encouraged to donate their personal papers to Waterloo.

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Hierarchical terms

Women's Studies

Women's Studies

Equivalent terms

Women's Studies

Associated terms

Women's Studies

1 Archival description results for Women's Studies

Only results directly related

The Woman's Bible.

Broadside condemning Elizabeth Cady Stanton's "The Woman's Bible" and the fight for women's suffrage. Published in 1895, Woman's Bible discusses Stanton's views that Christianity and masculine theology were some of the leading factors in keeping women from gaining rights. Although highly critized both before and during its publication, Woman's Bible was a bestseller and was reprinted twice in the year after its publication. The broadside here was printed approximately 25 years after the publication of Woman's Bible, likely during the time that the debate on the ratification of the 19th amendment to the US Constitution was raging.
The broadside excerpts passages from Stanton's work in an attempt to prove that fears around women's suffrage leaders are founded. The unknown author also implicates suffrage leaders Carrie Chapman Catt and Alice Stone Blackwell, even though neither had a hand in the publication of The Woman's Bible.

Stanton, Elizabeth Cady