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William Lyon Mackenzie King collection
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W.L. Mackenzie King : newspapers and clippings

Series consists of newspaper coverage of Mackenzie King's life, death and funeral. Significant issues of newspapers with major war-related headlines contain stories about Mackenzie King's prime-ministerial activities in relation to events of the day. However, the focus of this series is primarily coverage of Mackenzie King's death, memorial and funeral services published by major Ontario newspapers, often in more than one edition in a day.

William Lyon Mackenzie King collection.

Collection consists of material relating to William Lyon Mackenzie King from the estates of his brother Dougall Macdougall “Max” King and of his nephew (Dougall’s son) Arthur Macdougall King. Its major component is correspondence from Mackenzie King to Arthur King and also to Arthur’s wife Kathleen, over a period of twenty-seven years from 1923 to 1950.The first letter is dated 1923, a scant three years after the death of Max King, when Arthur and his twin brother Lyon were 10 years old and the last in the series is dated July 5, 1950. The collection also contains documents and ephemera relating to King’s death, funeral and will, received by Arthur King as a participant in those events; also present are issues of major Ontario newspapers that covered Mackenzie King's death and funeral as events unfolded day-by-day. A small selection of photographs, some formal and some snapshots, are also present. A selection of books retained by the family, among them works written and presented by John King and Dougall Macdougall King, also works owned by Mackenzie King as a boy, present a tangible reminder of the intellectual legacy of the King family.

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

W.L. Mackenzie King : death, funeral and estate

Series consists of documents received by Arthur King after the death of Mackenzie King on July 22, 1950: ephemera issued to participants in the memorial and funeral services, press releases, legal documents relating to the estate of Mackenzie King including his will and estate accounts, and commentary on his bequests.

King Family : photographs

Series consists of photographs of William Lyon Mackenzie King, his family and friends. Includes formal and informal portraits as well as snapshots taken in Toronto, Ottawa, Denver and Kingsmere.
Arranged in chronological order.

Laurier House to Arthur King

Typewritten letter from an unidentified person at Laurier House to Arthur King on August 8, 1950, who encloses a mimeograph copy of William Lyon Mackenzie’s King’s will and who promises to send a copy of Leonard Brockington’s broadcast.

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

Westminster Abbey : The order of service in memory of the Right Honourable William Lyon Mackenzie King, O.M., sometime Prime Minister of Canada, on Friday, July 28th, 1950 at 12.30 p.m.

Leaflet containing the order of service in memory of William Lyon Mackenzie King held July 28, 1950 at Westminster Abbey, these two copies owned by Arthur King, nephew of William Lyon Mackenzie King, and his wife Kathleen King. Includes clipping about the service and the peal of bells.

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

Ephemera from the state funeral of William Lyon Mackenzie King.

Ephemera belonging to Arthur King and relating to the funeral of William Lyon Mackenzie King, former Prime Minister of Canada. Includes two invitations for Arthur King and his wife Kathleen King to attend the state funeral to be held in Ottawa, Wednesday, July 26, 1950, a card allocating places on the special train from Ottawa to Toronto, and places in a car from Union Station to the cemetery, as well as two luggage tags for the special train. Also includes pre-printed thank you cards.

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

Arrangements for the state funeral of William Lyon Mackenzie King.

Untitled mimeograph draft of arrangements for the state funeral of William Lyon Mackenzie King, dated July 24, 1950, by W.P.J. O’Meara, Acting Under Secretary of State. Appendix “A” lists the honorary pallbearers and Appendix “B” gives marshalling instructions for those taking part in the funeral procession.

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

King, Arthur to May King.

Telegram from Arthur King to May Macdougall King on July 23, 1950 reporting the death of William Lyon Mackenzie King the night before: “Uncle Willie died quietly peacefully last night with John Harry and myself in attendance. I am representing father here and will detail full account subsequently. Fondest love to you all.
Salutation: none; Signature: “Arthur.”

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

Correspondence.

Series consists of correspondence from William Lyon Mackenzie King to his nephew Arthur King, also to Arthur's wife Kathleen Marion King, written between January 8, 1923 and July 5, 1950. Although Mackenzie King's first letters are directed towards the interests of a growing boy, over the years he stays involved in Arthur's progress through school, university and ultimately in the workplace. He mentions his own activities although often not in detail, sends thank you letters and holiday greetings. He gives Arthur advice on his career, mentions books of interest, and talks about politics, friends, family and visitors to Kingsmere.
Arranged chronologically.

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

King, William Lyon Mackenzie to Arthur King.

Typewritten letter from William Lyon Mackenzie King to his nephew Arthur on July 5, 1950, enclosing a letter that King has just received from Arthur's mother, who is on holiday in England. He says that she acknowledges the cheque King send to her through Arthur, and adds that Arthur might like to keep the letter "as a receipt."
Salutation: "My dear Arthur" [typewritten; Signature: "With every good wish, Yours sincerely," [all typewritten] "McKenzie King" [handwritten].

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

King, May to William Lyon Mackenzie King.

Handwritten Air Letter from May King in England to William Lyon Mackenzie King on June 28, 1950, describing her trip to England and thanking him for his gift.

Salutation: "My dear Willie" [handwritten]; Signature: "ever affectionately May" [handwritten].

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

King, William Lyon Mackenzie to Arthur King.

Typewritten letter from William Lyon Mackenzie King to his nephew Arthur on June 19, 1950, hoping that Arthur and his wife Kathleen had spent a pleasant day in Buffalo with Arthur's mother, that he is enclosing a cheque that he had promised to send for her, and that he is happy she is having a "delightful little holiday."
Salutation: "My dear Arthur" [handwritten]; Signature: "Yours affectionately, Uncle Willie" [handwritten].

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

King, William Lyon Mackenzie to Arthur King.

Typewritten letter from William Lyon Mackenzie King to his nephew Arthur on May 17, 1950 in reply to one from Arthur commenting on the official opening of Mackenzie House in Toronto on May 9, 1950.[1] King notes that the premier of the Province [Leslie Frost] and the mayor of the City of Toronto [Herbert E. McCallum], both Conservatives, took part in the ceremonies: "To my mind, that disclosed a fine spirit, and one which would have brought great happiness to Mackenzie's heart." King expresses concern that Arthur has not reported on a dinner at which Leonard W. Brockington was to speak: "I thought I had made it clear to Kathleen and yourself that I not only would have liked you both to be present to hear Mr. Brockington speak, but that I would be happy to make that part of the proceeding ムmy treat'. King describes the speech [about William Lyon Mackenzie] in superlatives.
In a handwritten added paragraph King wonders if he has not mixed up the Royal York and the King Edward hotels as the dinner location, "or if by any chance, you happen to be minus a dinner jacket or dress suit. Please let me know if you have the latter."
Salutation: "My dear Arthur" [handwritten]; Signature: "Once again my fondest love to you and Kathleen,Yours affectionately, Uncle Willie" [handwritten].

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

King, William Lyon Mackenzie to Arthur King.

Typewritten letter from William Lyon Mackenzie King to his nephew Arthur on Easter Sunday, April 9, 1950 in which he describes his own poor health and expresses concern for Arthur's. King asks for all the details about the oil burner that Arthur has acquired for his furnace and notes that the cost of oil makes heating almost as expensive as coal.
King thanks Arthur for congratulations on "the Royal Honours recently received, the Grand Cross of the Order of the Netherlands Lion and the Grand Cross of the Order of Leopold from Belgium," the which he notes belong to the nation and not to him personally. He goes on to quote from a letter from Churchill to himself published on p. 739 of Churchill's most recent work, The Grand Alliance, in which Churchill writes: " ムWhat a pleasure it is to see the whole empire pulling as one man, and believe me, my friend, I understand the reasons for your success in marshalling the grand war effort of Canada.' It is a nice tribute from the one who, more than any other, had to do with the direction of affairs at the time of the war." King expresses hope that he will soon be able to start work on his memoirs. He has still not ever visited Arthur and Kathleen's "little home in Toronto", and intends to do so "the first time I am in the city."
Salutation: "My dear Arthur" [typewritten]; Signature: "Yours very affectionately" [typewritten] "Uncle Willie" [handwritten].
Includes handwritten corrections.

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

King, William Lyon Mackenzie to Kathleen King.

Typewritten letter from William Lyon Mackenzie King to Kathleen King on January 18, 1950, on the topic of her vitamin supply. King notes that he is pleased that Arthur and Kathleen have decided to use his gift of money to purchase nesting tables.
Salutation: “My dear Kathleen:” [typewritten]; Signature: “Yours affectionately [typewritten], 'Uncle Willie.” [handwritten].

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

King, William Lyon Mackenzie to Arthur King.

Typewritten letter from William Lyon Mackenzie King to his nephew Arthur on January 6, 1950, containing belated thanks for their Christmas letters and gift of the book Cry The Beloved Country. King finds it "extraordinary" that three books recommended to him by Violet Markham were given to him by three separate family members that Christmas. The other two were Schweitzer's Out of My Life and Thought and Lead, Kindly Light. [1] King describes his poor health, commiserates with Arthur's disappointment at not seeing his mother at Christmas, and approves of Arthur and Kathleen's plans to use his Christmas cheque to buy a set of nesting tables. King reiterates his pleasure at receiving letters from Arthur and Kathleen, and ends with concern that Kathleen's vitamins might have run out and that he is sending more.
Salutation: "My dear Arthur" [handwritten]; Signature: "With fondest love and all good wishes to Kathleen and yourself. [Illegible, possibly Again as?] always, Yours affectionately, Uncle Willie" [handwritten].
Includes handwritten corrections.

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

Jaeger underwear belonging to William Lyon Mackenzie King.

One set of men's Jaeger beige cashmere and wool underwear, size 42, belonging to William Lyon Mackenzie King, consisting of of a jersey-knit shirt and a pair of bottoms. The shirt has three buttons with button placket reinforced with woven material. Mackenzie King's Initials “W.L.M.K.” are embroidered in red on the front right bottom above the ribbing. The shirt has a white woven label with red letters at centre inside back neck: “Jaeger, Pure Cashmere & Wool, Made in Gt. Britain.” The bottoms close with a three-button fly and have a lace-up gusset at centre back. The waistband and fly are reinforced inside with woven material; the gusset has two sets of embroidered eyelets laced with a white ribbon. Two sets of horizontal double loops made of woven fabric are sewn down outside at the waist on either side of the fly, possibly for attaching to the shirt. The T. Eaton Co. catalogue of 1920-1921 describes these as “brace loops.”[1] There is evidence of something having been sewn above the shirt ribbing, front left side, as thread knots remain. The bottoms have a white woven label, inside centre back, with red letters. The word “Jaeger” is at the centre of a diamond shape bearing text on all four sides: “Health & Comfort, Warrented Pure Wool.” Below the diamond is a ribbon shape bearing text: “Patent Unshrinkable Process,” and below this on the bottom edges is: “Made in Gt. Britain.”

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

King, William Lyon Mackenzie to Arthur King.

Typewritten letter from William Lyon Mackenzie King to his nephew Arthur on December 20, 1949, thanking Arthur and his wife Kathleen for 75th birthday congratulations. King notes that because he can't keep track of family birthdays, he is more appreciative when people remember his. He explains that he is enclosing a bank draft to be used, he hopes, on something for their home as a gift from him. King notes that he has just written to Arthur's mother, and closes by sending Christmas and New Year's wishes to Arthur and Kathleen. Salutation: "My dear Arthur" [handwritten]; Signature: "With fondest love to you both, Yours affectionately, Uncle Willie" [handwritten].

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

King, William Lyon Mackenzie to Arthur King.

Typewritten letter from William Lyon Mackenzie King to his nephew Arthur on June 14, 1949, expressing pleasure that Arthur and his wife Kathleen are going on holiday to Denver to see Arthur's mother. King cautions Arthur not to drive too fast or to far. He announces that he is now at Kingsmere for the summer, and that Arthur's Aunt Jennie and Rosabel will be staying with him in July.
Salutation: Dear Arthur [typewritten]; Signature: With fondest love and all good wishes to you both, Yours affectionately, Uncle Willie." [Handwritten].

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

King, William Lyon Mackenzie to Arthur King.

Typewritten letter from William Lyon Mackenzie King to his nephew Arthur on March 29, 1949, in reply to his of March 28. King notes that Arthur has written to Wilmot Gordon and has also acquired a dog. King cautions Arthur against being overworked.
Salutation: "My dear Arthur" [typewritten]; Signature: "Fondest love to you and Kathleen, Affectionately yours, Uncle Willie" [handwritten].

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

King, William Lyon Mackenzie to Arthur King.

Typewritten letter from William Lyon Mackenzie King to his nephew Arthur on March 22, 1949, relaying information from Arthur's friend Wilmot Gordon that his father had died, and encouraging Arthur to contact him.
Salutation: "My dear Arthur" [handwritten]; Signature: "With fondest love Yours affectionately Uncle Willie" [handwritten].

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

King, William Lyon Mackenzie to Kathleen King.

Typewritten and handwritten letter from William Lyon Mackenzie King to Kathleen King on January 8, 1949, acknowledging one received from Kathleen with news that the vitamins had arrived safely. He comments on Arthur’s mother’s visit. [typewritten].In an added handwritten paragraph King writes: “Your wild strawberry jam is awfully delicious. Mr & Mrs Guthrie of Paris, France, were the first to sample it at tea, a few days ago. [illegible word word word word word word word word] for Ottawa’s future as Canada’s capital. Today the Prime Minister of New Zealand Mr Fraser, and the High Commissioner, had a taste. They were all delighted. [illegible word] never tasted anything as good. Love again to you and Arthur.”
Salutation: “My dear Kathleen” [handwritten]; Signature: “Yours affectionately, W.L. Mackenzie King” [handwritten].

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

King, William Lyon Mackenzie to Arthur King.

Typewritten letter from William Lyon Mackenzie King to his nephew Arthur on December 28, 1948, containing effusive thanks to him and his wife Kathleen for letters and Christmas gift of hand-picked and preserved wild raspberry jam. King notes that the jam will be used for special occasions of afternoon tea at Laurier House or Kingsmere. King reminisces "I remember when Lord Athlone and Princess Alice used to come out to Kingsmere occasionally for a walk, there was nothing they enjoyed so much as some of the strawberry jam which I had there. Jam made from wild strawberries is, of course, the most delicious of all. [1]
King refers to his "little gift" to Arthur and Kathleen and says that "Nothing could give me more pleasure than that you should use the cheque toward the purchase of a rug for one of the rooms in your little home." He also extends his thanks to Arthur's mother for her letter and gift of books. King notes that is health is not good and that he was wise to have retired when he did. In closing, King mentions that he is sending Kathleen another supply of vitamins.
Salutation: "My dear Arthur" [handwritten]; Signature: "With love to you both Yours affectionately Uncle Willie" [handwritten].

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

King, William Lyon Mackenzie to Arthur King.

Typewritten letter from William Lyon Mackenzie King to his nephew Arthur on December 22, 1948, thanking him and his wife Kathleen for sending 74th birthday congratulations. King asks that his best wishes be extended to all members of Arthur and Kathleen's family that will be gathered at their "own" home, and expresses pleasure that Arthur's mother will be visiting them. King suggests that Arthur and Kathleen use the enclosed money order to add to the silver King gave them as a wedding present.
Salutation: "My dear Arthur" [handwritten]; Signature: "Yours affectionately Uncle Willie" [handwritten].
Includes handwritten corrections.
Includes two possible enclosures: a printed correspondence card (9 x 13 cm) sending Christmas and New year's wishes from King to all who had sent him greetings, dated December 1948. Also includes an empty envelope (7 x 10 cm) inscribed "To Arthur and Kathleen with love and all good wishes from Uncle Willie" in King's handwriting.

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

King, William Lyon Mackenzie to Arthur King.

Typewritten letter marked "Personal" from William Lyon Mackenzie King (while at the 1948 Commonwealth Prime Ministers' Conference in London, England) [1] to his nephew Arthur on October 18, 1948, in reply to a letter from Arthur and Kathleen apparently expressing concern about King's health. King downplays the press reports of his "condition" and explains that he has taken medical advice to "take a complete rest instead of attempting to go on with the proceedings of the Prime Ministers' Meetings at Downing Street," and anticipates being in bed for a further week until boarding the "Queen Elizabeth" on October 29.
King expresses interest in Arthur and Kathleen's house and garden, and notes that everything is "going so well for your mother."
Salutation: "My dear Arthur" [handwritten]; Signature: "Yours affectionately, Uncle Willie" [handwritten].
Includes handwritten corrections.

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

King, William Lyon Mackenzie to Arthur King.

Typewritten letter marked "Personal" from William Lyon Mackenzie King to his nephew Arthur on August 20, 1948, describing his relationship with John D. Rockefeller Jr., and mentioning his invitation to visit Mr. Rockfeller's "summer home at Seal Harbor, Maine." King anticipates going to Europe in three weeks, and notes that he is "now relieved of the leadership of the Party. On my return, I expect to be giving up office as well."[1] King declares the "Convention" as "a great success" [Liberal leadership election] [2] and wishes that Arthur and Kathleen had been there to "witness the ovations." He expresses his pleasure at Arthur and Kathleen's new home in Leaside, although his opening of Sunnybrook Hospital prevented him from visiting in person. He remarks on the pretty names "Southvale Drive" and "Leaside."
Salutation: "My dear Arthur" [handwritten]; Signature: "With fondest love to you both, Yours affectionately, Uncle Willie" [handwritten].

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

King, William Lyon Mackenzie to Kathleen King.

Typewritten letter, marked “Personal”, from William Lyon Mackenzie King to Kathleen King on May 21, 1948, in which he expresses pleasure at seeing Arthur and Kathleen in Toronto, ascribes their good health and happiness to having their own “little house,” and sends them wedding anniversary congratulations. He adds that he is sending more vitamins.
Salutation: My dear Kathleen” [handwritten]; Signature: With love to Arthur and yourself, Yours affectionately, W.L. Mackenzie King” [handwritten].

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

King, William Lyon Mackenzie to Arthur King.

Typewritten letter marked "Personal" from William Lyon Mackenzie King to his nephew Arthur on February 17, 1948, in response to one received. King informs Arthur that after some months of ill health, King's sister and Arthur's aunt, Jennie, has had an operation for a perforated appendix and has recovered. King describes also the "miraculous" recovery of Mr. Handy's son who, after having spent 14 months in hospital, is now at home "with his leg completely restored."
King expresses pleasure at Arthur's report of his progress at work and his advancement to a supervisory position, remarking "It means that your future is now secured."
King advises having, or moving to, living quarters with plenty of sunlight, as beneficial to health. He also agrees with Arthur that Arthur's mother has "gained a new strength and power," and asks, "How are the vitamins holding out?"
Salutation: "My dear Arthur" [handwritten; Signature: "Your loving uncle Willie."
Includes handwritten corrections.

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

King, William Lyon Mackenzie to Arthur King.

Typewritten letter marked "Personal" from William Lyon Mackenzie King to his nephew Arthur King on February 25, 1947 expressing anxiety about Arthur's "new apartment and removal to Toronto," and asking for specific details about his new home. Arthur had apparently been assisted in finding living quarters through D.B. Mansur, president of the Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation and "Mr. Handy" and King expresses surprise that Arthur has not yet followed up with them: "As soon as I learned of the change you had been able to effect in apartments, I rang up Mr. Mansur and thanked him personally for his kind intervention. I am sure that but for his personal interest in the matter and Mr. Handy's kind interest in advance, you would have had real difficulty in securing any quarters."
Footnote: "let me suggest that you visit Mr Mansur [&] Mr Handy without delay. But for their good office you might be very badly off. W"
King then addresses everyone's state of health and reminds Arthur that he must "do all that is in your power to prove your qualifications for the position you now have and to ensure advancement in the future;" also that "Toronto is a nice city in which to live and you will have opportunities of personal and business contacts there much greater than are likely to come elsewhere. I am sure you will make the most of them."
Includes handwritten correction.
Salutation: "My dear Arthur" [handwritten]; Signature: "With love to both, Yours affectionately, Uncle Willie" [handwritten].

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

King, William Lyon Mackenzie to Arthur King.

Typewritten letter marked "Personal" from William Lyon Mackenzie King to his nephew Arthur on December 26, 1947, expressing thanks for Arthur and his wife Kathleen's Christmas letter and gift to him of hand-painted tiles. “How sweet of you both to have remembered my admiration of the little paintings so exquisitely framed! I have already given them a place in my sunroom at Laurier House to which they are lending a note of added beauty and cheer. In the summer time I may take them to Kingsmere as well.” King continues in this effusive and somewhat repetitive vein, and again asks about their vitamin supply. King speculates that Arthur may have telephoned his mother and/or have written to her during the Christmas season, and informs Arthur that he had received a book from her entitled Human Destiny which he is looking forward to reading. [1]
Salutation: “My dear Arthur” [handwritten; Signature: “Again, with my warmest thanks to Kathleen and yourself for your lovely gift and letter, and much love to you both, Yours affectionately, Uncle Willie” [handwritten].
Includes handwritten corrections.

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

King, William Lyon Mackenzie to Arthur King.

Typewritten letter from William Lyon Mackenzie King to his nephew Arthur and his wife Kathleen on December 21, 1947, thanking them for their letters of “love and best wishes” for his 73rd birthday. He blames his current lack of communication on “how very strenuous the pace has been. I doubt if ever in my life I have had so much ground to cover, or been as active and busy as I have. “ He then notes “It has all been a kind of ‘grand finale’ to my many years in public life, and which in the nature of things, cannot be expected to continue much longer.” King explains that he has had no time to select a Christmas gift and so has instead enclosed a “Bank Money Order” to be used for something for their home “as coming from me; something that may serve to remind you at all times of my love and abiding affection for you both.”
Salutation: “Dear Arthur and Kathleen” [handwritten; Signature: “Again, with fondest love and best of wishes, Yours affectionately, Uncle Willie” [handwritten].
Includes handwritten corrections.
Includes enclosure: empty Christmas money-holder card, 16 x 8 cm folded. Inscribed in King’s hand: “To Arthur and Kathleen With love and all good wishes for Christmas and the new year from Uncle Willie, Xmas 1947."

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

King, William Lyon Mackenzie to Arthur King.

Typewritten letter marked "Personal" from William Lyon Mackenzie King to his nephew Arthur on August 18, 1947, thanking him and his wife Kathleen for their “charming little letter” on the death of King’s dog Pat, and noting “Naturally I feel his loss very much.” King expresses hope of seeing Arthur and Kathleen when he is “up at the Exhibition” [1] and gives details of his busy schedule during the days of his visit. Although he will not be able to visit them at home he has asked that they be sent tickets to the garden party being given by the Lieutenant Governor the Honourable Ray Lawson in the hopes that they may meet each other. King asks if Arthur remembers going with him and his brother Lyon to the opening of the Exhibition “the last time I was there. I think that was just twenty years ago.”
King asks about the vitamin supply.
Salutation: “My dear Arthur” [typewritten]; Signature: “With fondest love to you and Kathleen, Yours affectionately , Uncle Willie” [handwritten].
Includes handwritten corrections.

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

King, William Lyon Mackenzie to Arthur King.

Typewritten letter from William Lyon Mackenzie King to his nephew Arthur on August 2, 1947, responding to one just received, containing news of a holiday in Muskoka, and confirming receipt of fruit knives and forks with “precious associations” sent to Arthur and his wife Kathleen by Mackenzie King and his sister Jennie.
King thanks Arthur and Kathleen for their earlier letter of congratulations on achieving twenty years as Prime Minister. He describes the unveiling of his own and Sir Robert Borden’s portraits by Lord Alexander and mentions the presence of President Harry Truman. He declares his intent to send Arthur and Kathleen copies of Hansard of June 10 and 11 containing congratulations to himself, speeches made at the unveiling, and President Truman’s address to both Houses of Parliament.
King asks about the vitamin supply, and gives news about Mr. Handy’s son’s health.
Salutation: “My dear Arthur” [typewritten]; Signature: “With love to you and Kathleen, Yours affectionately, Uncle Willie” [handwritten.]

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

King, William Lyon Mackenzie to Arthur King.

Telegram from William Lyon Mackenzie King to his nephew Arthur King on June 20, 1947, informing him of the following day’s radio broadcast of President Harry Truman’s speech to Parliament. [1]
Salutation: none; Signature: “Love and all good wishes=W L Mackenzie King.”

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

King, William Lyon Mackenzie to Arthur King.

Typewritten letter marked "Personal" from William Lyon Mackenzie King to his nephew Arthur King on January 19, 1947 in response to and supportive of the news that Arthur is moving to Toronto to work for Ontario Hydro. King enumerates Arthur’s qualifying experience and background, compares Toronto to Montreal as a suitable place to live, and offers a list of factors to consider when looking for a place to live.
Salutation: “My dear Arthur” [handwritten]; Signature: “With fondest love to you and Kathleen, and again with many thanks for your letter and all good wishes Believe me [?] Affectionately yours Uncle Willie” [handwritten].
Includes handwritten corrections.

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

King, William Lyon Mackenzie to Arthur King.

Typewritten letter from William Lyon Mackenzie King to his nephew Arthur King on January 4, 1947, commenting on Arthur’s mother’s visit [May King, nee Wookey] and reports he had received of her apparent good health.
Salutation: “Dear Arthur” ; Signature: “With fondest love, Yours affectionately Uncle Willie” [handwritten].

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

King, William Lyon Mackenzie to Arthur King.

Handwritten notes by William Lyon Mackenzie on a small envelope, inscribed to “To Arthur and Kathleen with love and all good wishes, Uncle Willie, Christmas 1946,” with additional note “Not to open till Christmas morning.”
This envelope is enclosed in a mailing envelope postmarked Toronto Dec. 22, 1946, with “WLMK, PM” in bottom left hand corner [handwritten.]

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

King, William Lyon Mackenzie to Arthur King.

Typewritten letter from William Lyon Mackenzie King to his nephew Arthur King on January 17, 1946, a short note of thanks, comments on their healthy appearance and apologies for not having been able to talk longer.
Includes envelope inscribed only “Mr and Mrs Arthur King [handwritten].
Salutation: “My dear Arthur”; Signature: “Love to you both, [typewritten] Yours affectionately, Uncle Willie” [handwritten].

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

King, William Lyon Mackenzie to Arthur King.

Typewritten letter from William Lyon Mackenzie King to his nephew Arthur King on January 17, 1946, in which he encloses $5.00 to complete the sum needed for a radio cabinet (see letter Dec. 29, 1945). Also with reference to the previous letter, he continues on the subject of the vitamins he has sent them.
Note on p. 1 “Please find $5.00 enclosed, WLMK” [handwritten].
Includes handwritten correction.
Salutation: “My dear Arthur” ; Signature: “Yours affectionately, Uncle Willie” [handwritten].

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

King, William Lyon Mackenzie to Arthur King.

Typewritten letter marked "Personal" from William Lyon Mackenzie King to his nephew Arthur King on December 29, 1945 expressing his pleasure at receiving from Arthur and Kathleen, John Erskine’s book The Human Life of Jesus. [1] He emphasizes the importance of the life of Jesus to mankind, and says “I am so glad you have made this particular selection as a Christmas gift. You could have thought of nothing more appropriate and, I may add, nothing which to myself could bring a fuller measure of joy. To you both, I send my warmest thanks for a present I shall always greatly treasure and which will be to me an added strength and inspiration as I continue to go on toward the distant horizon and the glow which I hope may be mine as one approaches the close of one’s earthly life.” King the offers to pay the entire cost of a radio cabinet to hold Arthur and Kathleen’s collection of records, a sum greater than the original amount previously sent to them. King mentions “the little talk” they had on Christmas Day; also that he intends to send a fresh supply of vitamins. [2]
Salutation: “My dear Arthur” [handwritten]; Signature: “Please let this letter bring to you and to Kathleen my very best of wishes for this New Year and My fondest love, Yours affectionately , Uncle Willie” [handwritten].
Includes handwritten corrections.

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

King, William Lyon Mackenzie to Arthur King.

Typewritten letter from William Lyon Mackenzie King to his nephew Arthur King on December 22, 1945, thanking Arthur and Kathleen for their Christmas letter and wondering what book they have sent him to open on Christmas Day. “I have no doubt it is among the packages on the little bench in my upstairs hall, being kept in reserve for Christmas morning, when Santa Claus, Pat and I sit down together to open the several Christmas gifts.” King expresses regret that he has not had time to find a gift suitable for their new apartment but is instead enclosing an envelope. King also expresses pleasure that Arthur enjoys his work and that both Arthur and Kathleen are “both so happy in your charming little apartment.”
Salutation: “My dear Arthur” [handwritten]; Signature: “With fondest love to you and Kathleen, Your loving uncle, Willie” [handwritten].
Letter also accompanied by a separate envelope inscribed “To Arthur and Kathleen” and a Christmas money-holder card inscribed "To Dear Arthur and Kathleen With fondest love and best wishes for a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year from Uncle Willie, Christmas 1945," both inscriptions in Mackenzie King's handwriting.

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

King, William Lyon Mackenzie to Arthur King.

Telegram from William Lyon Mackenzie King to his nephew Arthur King on September 22, 1945, inviting Arthur and his wife Kathleen to dine with him that evening in his “car” [railroad car] at Windsor Street Station.
Salutation: none; Signature: “W.L.Mackenzie.King.”

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

King, William Lyon Mackenzie to Arthur King.

Typewritten letter marked "Personal" from William Lyon Mackenzie King to his nephew Arthur King on July 6, 1945. King expresses his pleasure that Arthur and Kathleen enjoyed a holiday in Muskoka and that they have moved into a new home in Montreal.
Salutation: “My dear Arthur” ; Signature: “With fondest love, [typewritten] to you both, Yours affectionately, Uncle Willie” [handwritten].

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

King, William Lyon Mackenzie to Arthur King.

Telegram from William Lyon Mackenzie King to his nephew Arthur king, composed on May 20, 1945 and received on May 21, 1945, congratulating Arthur and his wife Kathleen on their second wedding anniversary. Mackenzie King was in Swift current probably in advance of the federal election of June 11, in which he lost his own seat, Prince Albert Riding. [1]
Salutation: none; Signature: "Love and all good wishes=:Mackenzie King."

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

Newspaper coverage of World War II containing mention of William Lyon Mackenzie King : “It’s all over in Europe! Nazi surrender complete,” The Evening Citizen, Monday, May 7, 1945.

This issue of the Evening Citizen for May 7, 1945 contains mentions of William Lyon Mackenzie King: “Not an hour for exultation, says Premier King,” p. 11; “Mr. King visits freed Canadians travelling home,” p. 15. Mr. King and Louis St. Laurent who were in California for the United Nations Security Conference, paid an unexpected visit to 52 Canadians who had been interned for three years in Japanese prison camps in the Philippines.

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

King, William Lyon Mackenzie to Arthur King.

Typewritten letter from William Lyon Mackenzie King to his nephew Arthur King on May 7, 1945, “dictated in the hour of Victory which has still to be announced.” He says that “dear Lyon” will be “rejoicing with us all today.” He sends good wishes to all at Laurier House, and thanks Arthur for taking Pat for a walk. King was attending the United Nations Conference in San Francisco. [1] On May 7 the Nazis surrendered unconditionally with May 8 to be the end of the war, Victory in Europe day. [2]
Salutation: “Dear Arthur” [handwritten]; Signature: “With fondest love to Kathleen & yourself. Your affectionate uncle Willie” [handwritten].
Includes envelope. Both envelope and letter marked “Personal.”

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

Newspaper coverage of World War II containing mention of William Lyon Mackenzie King : “Free peoples of world mourn passing of Franklin D. Roosevelt, friend of humanity,” The Evening Citizen, Friday, April 13, 1945.

This issue of the Evening Citizen for April 13, 1945 contains several mentions of William Lyon Mackenzie King, as well as on p. 13 a press photo of Roosevelt, King and Churchill taken at a press conference in Quebec.

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

King, William Lyon Mackenzie to Arthur King.

Typewritten letter from William Lyon Mackenzie King to his nephew Arthur King on December 26, 1944, thanking Arthur and his wife Kathleen for a Christmas letter and gift, “doylies[sic] … exquisite in their texture and design. In taste, they could not be more to my liking. They are a real addition to Laurier House.” King has left a gift at Arthur and Kathleen’s that requires samples and going to shops, but is otherwise not described. King send this letter with a promised copy of Emil Ludwig’s Portrait Sketch and also a copy of “a little book entitled “Rendezvous," which I think you would both like to read. [1.] I read a copy myself many months ago. It wholly accords with my own belief. I want you to have it as a remembrance of Dear Lyon.” Salutation: “My Dear Arthur” [handwritten]; Signature: “Yours affectionately, Uncle Willie” [handwritten].

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

King, William Lyon Mackenzie to Arthur King.

Typewritten letter from William Lyon Mackenzie King to his nephew Arthur King on October 15, 1944 concerning the “Inscription in memory of Surgeon Lieutenant William Lyon Mackenzie King, F.R.C.S. to be cut on memorial in Mount Pleasant Cemetery.“ King is waiting for family to approve the inscription and details of lettering before placing the order. Arthur’s twin brother Lyon had died on Sept. 20, 1943 when the St. Croix was torpedoed by a German U-Boat and all men aboard except one perished. [1]
Salutation: “My Dear Arthur” [handwritten]; Signature: “Yours affectionately , Uncle Willie” [handwritten].

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

King, William Lyon Mackenzie to Arthur King.

Typewritten letter from William Lyon Mackenzie King to his nephew Arthur King on October 9, 1944, written as a reminder to Arthur to make efforts to locate Sir Campbell Stuart [1] on Stuart’s return to Ottawa, October 24, 1944.
Salutation: “My Dear Arthur”; Signature: “Yours affectionately, Uncle Willie, This is just a reminder. W” [handwritten]. Includes underlining.

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

Newspaper coverage of World War II containing mention of William Lyon Mackenzie King : “Invasion!” The Ottawa Citizen, Tuesday, June 6, 1944.

One section of The Ottawa Citizen, June 6, 1944 concerning the D-Day allied landings in France. “Gov’t lights quickly go on: officialdom here in dark on reported landings,” The Ottawa Citizen, Tuesday, June 6, 1944, p. 8. This short story reports on early morning lights going on at government buildings as “service chiefs and public relations officers, hearing German invasion reports, hurried to their offices.” The final paragraph reads: “A servant at Laurier House, home of Prime Minister Mackenzie king, said Mr. King had retired. She declined to awaken him.”

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

King, William Lyon Mackenzie to Arthur King.

Typewritten letter marked "Personal" from William Lyon Mackenzie King to his nephew Arthur King on Dec. 27, 1943, thanking Arthur and his wife Kathleen for the Christmas letter and gift of handkerchiefs, and sending New Year’s wishes.
Salutation: “My Dear Arthur” [handwritten]; Signature: “Yours affectionately, Uncle Willie” [handwritten].
Includes insertions handwritten.

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

King, William Lyon Mackenzie to Arthur King.

Typewritten letter from William Lyon Mackenzie King to his nephew Arthur King on December 19, 1943. King expresses Christmas wishes to Arthur, his wife Kathleen and Kathleen’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas in Toronto. King notes that he has a gift for them in their new home, “I would like to send you, just as a souvenir of the day itself, and also of a central event in Canadian history, a little picture which was taken at the time of the Quebec Conference[1], and which I am sure you would both like to have.”
Salutation: “My Dear Arthur” [handwritten]; Signature: “With fondest of love, Yours affectionately, Uncle Willie” [handwritten].

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

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