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King, William Lyon Mackenzie King, Kathleen Marion
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King, William Lyon Mackenzie to Arthur King.

Typewritten letter from William Lyon Mackenzie King to his nephew Arthur King on January 17, 1946, a short note of thanks, comments on their healthy appearance and apologies for not having been able to talk longer.
Includes envelope inscribed only “Mr and Mrs Arthur King [handwritten].
Salutation: “My dear Arthur”; Signature: “Love to you both, [typewritten] Yours affectionately, Uncle Willie” [handwritten].

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

King, William Lyon Mackenzie to Arthur King.

Handwritten notes by William Lyon Mackenzie on a small envelope, inscribed to “To Arthur and Kathleen with love and all good wishes, Uncle Willie, Christmas 1946,” with additional note “Not to open till Christmas morning.”
This envelope is enclosed in a mailing envelope postmarked Toronto Dec. 22, 1946, with “WLMK, PM” in bottom left hand corner [handwritten.]

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

King, William Lyon Mackenzie to Arthur King.

Typewritten letter from William Lyon Mackenzie King to his nephew Arthur and his wife Kathleen on December 21, 1947, thanking them for their letters of “love and best wishes” for his 73rd birthday. He blames his current lack of communication on “how very strenuous the pace has been. I doubt if ever in my life I have had so much ground to cover, or been as active and busy as I have. “ He then notes “It has all been a kind of ‘grand finale’ to my many years in public life, and which in the nature of things, cannot be expected to continue much longer.” King explains that he has had no time to select a Christmas gift and so has instead enclosed a “Bank Money Order” to be used for something for their home “as coming from me; something that may serve to remind you at all times of my love and abiding affection for you both.”
Salutation: “Dear Arthur and Kathleen” [handwritten; Signature: “Again, with fondest love and best of wishes, Yours affectionately, Uncle Willie” [handwritten].
Includes handwritten corrections.
Includes enclosure: empty Christmas money-holder card, 16 x 8 cm folded. Inscribed in King’s hand: “To Arthur and Kathleen With love and all good wishes for Christmas and the new year from Uncle Willie, Xmas 1947."

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

King, William Lyon Mackenzie to Arthur King.

Telegram of good wishes from William Lyon Mackenzie to Mr. and Mrs. Arthur M. King on their wedding day, May 20, 1943. The telegram is sent from The White House in Washington DC.
Salutation: none; Signature: “W L Mackenzie King.”
Includes envelope.

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

King, William Lyon Mackenzie to Arthur and Kathleen King.

Six engraved calling cards from William Lyon Mackenzie King to his nephew Arthur and Arthur's wife Kathleen, four of them dated and inscribed in Mackenzie King's handwriting, probably as accompaniments to letters or gifts.
Envelope inscribed “Mr. and Mrs. Arthur King” in Mackenzie King's handwriting.

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

King, William Lyon Mackenzie to Kathleen King.

Typewritten letter, marked “Personal”, from William Lyon Mackenzie King to Kathleen King on May 21, 1948, in which he expresses pleasure at seeing Arthur and Kathleen in Toronto, ascribes their good health and happiness to having their own “little house,” and sends them wedding anniversary congratulations. He adds that he is sending more vitamins.
Salutation: My dear Kathleen” [handwritten]; Signature: With love to Arthur and yourself, Yours affectionately, W.L. Mackenzie King” [handwritten].

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

King, William Lyon Mackenzie to Kathleen King.

Typewritten and handwritten letter from William Lyon Mackenzie King to Kathleen King on January 8, 1949, acknowledging one received from Kathleen with news that the vitamins had arrived safely. He comments on Arthur’s mother’s visit. [typewritten].In an added handwritten paragraph King writes: “Your wild strawberry jam is awfully delicious. Mr & Mrs Guthrie of Paris, France, were the first to sample it at tea, a few days ago. [illegible word word word word word word word word] for Ottawa’s future as Canada’s capital. Today the Prime Minister of New Zealand Mr Fraser, and the High Commissioner, had a taste. They were all delighted. [illegible word] never tasted anything as good. Love again to you and Arthur.”
Salutation: “My dear Kathleen” [handwritten]; Signature: “Yours affectionately, W.L. Mackenzie King” [handwritten].

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

King, William Lyon Mackenzie to Kathleen King.

Typewritten letter from William Lyon Mackenzie King to Kathleen King on January 18, 1950, on the topic of her vitamin supply. King notes that he is pleased that Arthur and Kathleen have decided to use his gift of money to purchase nesting tables.
Salutation: “My dear Kathleen:” [typewritten]; Signature: “Yours affectionately [typewritten], 'Uncle Willie.” [handwritten].

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

King, William Lyon Mackenzie to Kathleen Thomas.

Engraved calling card: "Mr. W.L. Mackenzie King, Laurier House, Ottawa, Canada," inscribed in King's handwriting to Miss Kathleen M. Thomas on December 24, 1942: "So many thanks for your beautiful card of Christmas greetings. My very best of wishes to you for the New Year. So kind of you to have had me in your thoughts at this season. Again, my very best of wishes to you. WLMK 24-Dec-42."

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

King, William Lyon Mackenzie to Kathleen Thomas.

Handwritten promissory note from William Lyon Mackenzie King to Miss Kathleen Thomas on May 16, 1943, for one hundred dollars as a souvenir of her wedding day May 20, 1943. [her future husband is William Lyon Mackenzie King's nephew Arthur Macdougall King.]

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

King, William Lyon Mackenzie to Kathleen Thomas.

Handwritten letter from William Lyon Mackenzie King to Miss Kathleen Thomas on May 16, 1943.
Transcription: “My dear Kathleen: This is the week on which you and Arthur are to be married. I have waited until this Sunday morning to write to you, not being too sure during the past few days just what my movements might be in the course of the present week. You no doubt will have seen from the papers that the President and Mr. Churchill have invited me to come to Washington for talks together, for meetings, conference, and the like, in the course of Mr Churchill's stay. It is now clear that I shall be obliged to leave tomorrow afternoon at the latest, and that I shall be obliged to be there in Washington on the day of your wedding, Thursday May 20th.
I need not tell you how sorry I am to have to disappoint Arthur and yourself; and, myself, to miss the pleasure of being with you both at the marriage ceremony, and to sign the register as a witness, as I did in the case of Margery and Lyon's wedding. However, there is no alternative, as Mr. Churchill is expecting me to be with him on Tuesday, and the President has invited me to be his guest, at the White House, on Wednesday spending the night there, and attending a meeting of the Pacific Council on Thursday morning, and a meeting of delegates from different parts of the British Empire, on Monday afternoon. I mention these engagements because of their importance and historic significance, and that you may know just why it will not be possible for me to be with you all on the day of, and at the time of your wedding. Perhaps, in the long run, a message from the White House, on the day of the wedding, may come to be an even more significant and welcome souvenir of the occasion than the witnessing of the marriage ceremony, and being a witness to its having taken place. Still I should have liked to have been with you and Arthur as I was with Margery and Lyon.
You know, I am sure, all the good wishes that I send to you for the day and for the Nova vita [underlined] on which you enter at that time. I wish you and Arthur the greatest possible happiness. As you both have a high purpose in life, and a love of service, and with the [will be?] sharing kindred ideals, I am certain that the way will open out before you in [to?] new widening vistas of opportunities, and of realization of your highest hopes. It will, I imagine, not be without its difficulties and privations at the start, and until this time of war becomes something of the past. You will have in that the consolation of knowing that you are sharing with others the sacrifices by which in the end, all that is highest in attainment is accomplished. There will be, too, [illegible] much sunshine and gladness along the way.
I should like to make you a little gift which would be something you would like to have from me, as a remembrance of your wedding day. In order that I may be sure the choice would be something you yourself would approve, I am going to ask you to help me in the selection of it, after you come to Ottawa, where we can confer together about it. Meanwhile, please accept 'my promise to pay' with my love and best of wishes for May the 20th, 1943, and for the days, and months and years to come. I pray through this all, you may be greatly blessed.”
Salutation: “My dear Kathleen,” [handwritten; Signature: “Yours affectionately, W.L. Mackenzie King.”

King, William Lyon Mackenzie

King, William Lyon Mackenzie to Kathleen Thomas.

Telegram of good wishes from William Lyon Mackenzie King to Miss Kathleen M. Thomas on May 19, 1943: “Please let this message bring to you on the morning of your wedding day every loving good wish for your happiness today and through the years to come I am sorry not to have been able to be present at the wedding ceremony but my thoughts will be with you all. “
Salutation: none; Signature: “W L Mackenzie King.”

King, William Lyon Mackenzie